the boozing you is a liar

if you drink, it creates a whole, different version of you, and it’s not the real you.

 

 

If you drink, you change the trajectory of your life in a large way. So when we stop drinking, it’s like there’s two people – the old us (the boozer) and the new us (the sober us). Which one is the real one?

This audio is taken from podcast SP203 (the full version of the audio is 30 minutes long).

 

Download the audio podcast episode 203

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(ps, my blog allows for anonymous comments – so you don’t have to fill in a name or an email address to post your comment below).

 

Belle

I want to put this online, to hold myself accountable. I want to document the noise in my head. I'm tired of thinking about drinking. date of last drink: june 30, 2012

4 thoughts to “the boozing you is a liar”

  1. I found this interview hilarious, and just an interesting conversation. I wonder what listeners of the show thought., maybe it got some people to question their own drinking and that’s awesome. I agree a call in show with this guy would be radio! I went to my first event just last night where I was the only person who was not drinking the first hour was ok,but it went downhill from there,as soon as I could I got out of there….I was bored to death. Now I know what I looked like when I was drinking!

  2. I agree. The boozing you IS a liar. Little white lies, unimportant lies, big lies.
    I find some people some of the most honest and true. That’s because honesty is freedom.

  3. Not even on my Day 0 yet (for the 5,432th time), but your interview was legitimately great. I think that what that interviewer might have needed to hear is that there is a difference…there are those who drink a few pints at a dinner party and have a lovely time. And those who drink a few pints and then a few more…and then have a mind-bending, stomach-churning, staggering head-holding trip home. And then the awful next day. It doesn’t matter if he understands that or not–your subscribers do. It’s never just a few pints once in a while at a dinner party, it’s the solitary experience of getting drunk (around other people or not) and ultimately becoming alone. You said that so well.

    I think that what it is important to impart to your interviewer is that you are not suggesting that everyone at all of the dinner parties in the world become sober (are you?). Just that people who really know that they should, maybe should.

    I think you are preaching to those who have gone farther than a proper pint at a proper dinner party, and for whom it’s not longer a laughing matter. Those people hear you.

    You do good work. Good on you.

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