do i have to count days?

Here’s an extract from the  book

do i have to count days

from Clementine: “Why do you think it’s important to have continuous sober time? Why is it more valuable to have 60 days in a row, than to have 29 days, a week off drinking, and then 29 more days (like me)?”

~

me:
I think day counting is important because each day represents a day when you said NO. You are building a wall between the ‘you’ back there, and the ‘new you’ over here, and so every sober day is a new brick in that wall. 

There are many forums and online communities that have pledges like “let’s plan to do 15 out of 30 days sober this month,” but they are not continuous days.

This doesn’t help us; we don’t get anywhere. On the days we’re not drinking, we are waiting to drink again. It’s like holding your breath and going underwater for a day. 

To me, the reason for a longer goal (100 days) is that you have to actually go forward and learn something. Once you remove the booze, you practise new things like self-soothing, treats, and learning to change the channel in your head. 

If you don’t pay attention to your sober momentum, then any day can be a drinking day or a sober day. By counting, you’re saying to Wolfie: “I’m not doing this. I’m getting the hell out of here. As far as I can, far away from you. One sober day at a time.”

 

Belle

I want to put this online, to hold myself accountable. I want to document the noise in my head. I’m tired of thinking about drinking. date of last drink: june 30, 2012

64 thoughts to “do i have to count days?”

  1. I couldn’t even tell you how many times I’d tried moderation before pledging to do 100 days. Counting the days for me adds to the amount I’d have to lose – I’ve worked so hard for my 32 days, I don’t want to give up that sober momentum easily.

  2. Building up consecutive days sober is definitely important! I tried the off and on thing, and for me it definitely doesn’t work. It gets harder and harder to stop.
    Another reason is all the healing your body has to do, it takes time. It took me to about 120 days before my body started feel better, I’m sleeping normally, I’m not so hormonal, my digestive system runs better, and the big one for me is the brain fog has completely been lifted. Non of these areas ever improved when I tried controlled drinking

  3. None is unambiguous. Not half a glass ( which it never is) or just for special occasions ( like Tuesdays) or when nobody else knows about it. Eventually you just become the person that doesn’t drink. To others and more importantly to yourself. DRx

Leave a Reply